Indigenous health in Latin America and the Caribbean

by Raul A. Montenegro and Carolyn Stephens.

This review is the second in a series on Indigenous health, covering different regions and issues. We look briefly at the current state of Indigenous health in Latin America and the Caribbean, a region with over 400 different indigenous groups and a total population of 45 to 48 million people. We describe the complex history and current reality of Indigenous peoples’ situation within the American continent. We discuss the importance of Indigenous health systems and medicines, and look at changing political environments in the region. The paper concludes with a discussion of the changing political and legislative environment in Latin American countries.

The paper can be read and downloaded here.

Laureate Alyn Ware honours women peace and disarmament advocates in Nigeria

Alyn Ware, 2009 Right Livelihood Laureate, delivered a RLC lecture in Nigeria on May 25th 2017, and participated in a public event the day before jointly organized by the RLC Campus Port Harcourt and the Centre for Conflict and Gender Development Studies, University of Port Harcourt, to commemorate the International Women’s Day for Peace and Disarmament.
Alyn used the occasion to release a joint statement of members of the World Future Council and laureates of the Right Livelihood Award from around the world.

 

 

Women leading for Peace and Disarmament

May 24, 2017

‘Involving women in peace and disarmament processes elevates the prospect of their success’, according to recipients of the Right Livelihood Award and members of the World Future Council who released a statement today – Women Leading for Peace and Disarmament – to commemorate the International Women’s Day for Peace and Disarmament.

‘We highlight the success of peace and disarmament initiatives in which women have played an important role, including in Bougainville, Colombia, Iran, Liberia, Mexico, Nigeria, Northern Ireland, Philippines, Sierra Leone, and other regions around the world.’

Coming just two days after the tragic terrorist bombing in Manchester UK, the statement condemns terrorist acts and any other forms of indiscriminate violence, including the use of nuclear weapons.

‘We express concern over the existential threats to humanity and the planet from climate change and the increased threat of nuclear war – a situation which has moved the Bulletin of Atomic Scientists to move the Doomsday Clock to 2½ minutes to midnight. The threats to our planet – of climate change, environmental degradation, poverty, terrorism and war – can only be overcome by nations and the global community working in cooperation – something not possible while nations maintain large and expensive militaries and threaten to destroy each other, including with nuclear weapons.’

The statement highlights the opportunity for progress on nuclear disarmament provided by the negotiations by non-nuclear States which will take place in June-July this year on a draft agreement to ban nuclear weapons, and the UN High Level Conference on Nuclear Disarmament which will take place in 2018 and will include nuclear armed and non-nuclear States.

‘UN High Level Conferences in recent years have achieved success, including agreements on the 17 Sustainable Development Goals, the Paris Agreement on Climate Change and the New York Declaration on Refugees and Migrants,’ says Alyn Ware, one of the Right Livelihood Laureates endorsing the statement. ‘So we hope for similar success on nuclear disarmament at the 2018 UN High Level Conference. We also support the Women’s March to Ban the Bomb being held in New York to promote the UN nuclear ban negotiations.’

‘And we highlight the possibilities to invest in peace and sustainable development if we re-allocate just a small portion of the $1.7 trillion spent globally on the military. As such we call on governments to support the Kazakhstan proposal to reduce national military budgets by at least 1% and reallocate these resources to meet the Sustainable Development Goals.’

RLC/BICC Panel Discussion: Academic Freedom and International Cooperation at Risk – Turkey and Beyond

Academic freedom and international cooperation have been increasingly at risk in Turkey in the last years. University Deans, Professors and other scientists were forced to step down, a travel ban was imposed on many academics, and Turkish scientists working abroad were pressured to return to Turkey. Many journalists and newspaper editors have been detained and harassed, particularly since the coup attempt last year.

Dr. Özgür Mumcu, journalist with the “Alternative Nobel Prize”-awarded Cumhuriyet newspaper discussed with Antje Schlamm, Head of Section Scholarship Programmes East Central Europe, South East Europe, Turkey at the German Academic Exchange Service (DAAD), how Universities, editors and journalists deal with these restrictions on and hindrance of their work.

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