Category Archives: Research – Blog

Indigenous health in Latin America and the Caribbean

by Raul A. Montenegro and Carolyn Stephens.

This review is the second in a series on Indigenous health, covering different regions and issues. We look briefly at the current state of Indigenous health in Latin America and the Caribbean, a region with over 400 different indigenous groups and a total population of 45 to 48 million people. We describe the complex history and current reality of Indigenous peoples’ situation within the American continent. We discuss the importance of Indigenous health systems and medicines, and look at changing political environments in the region. The paper concludes with a discussion of the changing political and legislative environment in Latin American countries.

The paper can be read and downloaded here.

CURLS 2017 now open for registration!

The RLC partner CURLS organises a People-Planet Partnership workshop in July, 18th – August 2nd, 2017, in Bangkok, Thailand.

CURLS 2017

  • Workshops with Right Livelihood Award Laureate and experience facilitators
  • Intercultural Dialogue with participants from different country
  • Experiential learning in the communities
  • Individual project design
  • Forest walk: from Ego-Self to Eco-Self
  • Inside-Out & Theater activism with experts

Students and interested individuals interested in this programme are invited to apply here: www.wellbeingsummer.wordpress.com.

 

RLC Bonn student Alejandro conducting field research in Chile

RLC Bonn PhD student Alejandro Mora Motta is developing his field work since June 2016 in Chile.
In collaboration with Right Livelihood Laureate Prof. Dr. Manfred Max-Neef and RLC Valdivia, Alejandro is currently in the field phase of his research in Los Ríos, Chile. HiAlejandro1s project focuses on how peasant and indigenous communities well-being has been affected by the model of exotic tree plantations, which is the main forestry model in Chile. He has approached different communities following a bottom up participatory approach that allows to understand the territorial transformation through the lenses of local people, and his main research focus is in rural La Unión, Municipality of Los Ríos.Alejandro3Alejandro2

Besides, Alejandro has performed collaborative research in two lines. First, he was involved with the methodological support for an indigenous community in the context of a new Law Project of Biodiversity and Protected Areas. This was thanks to the collaboration with the researcher Sarah Kelly-Richards of the Arizona University. Second, he is collaborating with the TESES group of theAlejandro4 Austral University.

As a member of the RLC Valdivia team, he was involved in the coordination, the logistics and the promotion of the event ‘Activists for a better world’, within the Congress “La transdisciplina hecha práctica”.  In this event he presented a first version of his research with the presentation “El modelo forestal chileno, entre la economía verde y el (neo)extractivismo”.

 

Call for Applications: PhD-course at Ghanaian-German Center for Development Studies (GGCDS)

The Ghanaian-German Centre for Development Studies (GGCDS) offers seven PhD-Positions at the University of Ghana, starting in August 2017. Qualified persons can apply for a four-year full-time PhD Program in Development Studies as of August 2017. The deadline for applications is March 31, 2017.

Find more information here, or have a look into their official call here, please.

 

RLC director Prof. Anwar Fazal published Sourcebook for Changemakers

To celebrate his 75th birthday, Prof. Fazal has drafted another multiverse adventure, a selection of initiatives and projects of hope – the right livelihood way.

“We live in a world sadly dominated by the trinity of “badness” – the culture of violence, of manipulation and of waste. People everywhere are rising against this badness – a phenomenon that Paul Hawken calls “Blessed Unrest”. We see springs of action, candles of hope, sparks of courage that are making a difference. There is a trinity of “goodness” that gives a vision of (a) balance and harmony, (b) the culture of stewardship of Mother Earth and, (c) accountability for the future. The book hopes to share and spread these ideas and suggest actions to make them happen.”

Please download the e-book here. Prof. Fazal is happy to receive comments and feedback, which can be sent to the RLC Global Secretariat.

2nd India-Sweden exchange seminar took place in Lund, Sweden

A report on the PhD course “Critical Urban Theory in Practice”  Module II, Sweden Lund 4-8 April 2016
by Dr. Maryam Nastar: Course Organizer, Lund University Centre for Sustainability Studies

The second module of the PhD course, Critical Urban Theory in Practice started off on 4 April 2016 with 8 students from India, UK and Sweden. This module was organized and funded by Lund University Centre for Sustainability Studies (LUCSUS), one of the Right Livelihood College (RLC) campuses. The initiative was also co-funded by the Robert Bosch Foundation through the Global Secretariat of RLC in Bonn, Germany. Further information on the first module can be found in the section Campus-News of RLC Mumbai.

After an introduction to the course by Dr. Maryam Nastar, Dr. Turaj Faran presented elements of social movements and contributing factors to their success and failure. This was followed by Prof. Eric Clark’s lecture on political, historical and economic forces that social movements are up against, within the urban context. On the second day of the course, Dr. Anders Lund Hansen and Emmerik Warburg, from Christiania Researchers In Residence (CRIR.net), led a fieldtrip to Freetown Christiania, in Copenhagen, Denmark. During the excursion, students got to know about the history of the community struggles and the challenges that community activists have faced over the last decades in relation to public spaces and property in Christiania.

Students during the fieldtrip to Freetown Christiania. Photo by
Dr. Maryam Nastar, LUCSUS.

The fieldtrip and earlier literature reviews formed the basis for seminar discussion on the day after. This was followed by Dr. Maja Essebo’s lecture on instances of struggles for urban spaces in the global North and the notion of the right to the city in practice. By taking off from the field observations and going back to critical urban theory, Dr. Andy Merrifield, the course guest lecturer, expanded on Lefebvre’s notion of the right to the city through an excellent lecture on the origin of the concept and how it is co-opted by different organizations in contemporary urban studies and research.


The public lecture by Dr. Andy Merrifield. Photo by Dr. Maryam Nastar, LUCSUS.
On the last day of the course, Dr. Merrifield gave an open lecture about Professional and Amateur Urbanism in our Urban Age, wherein he discussed the dominant camps of urban studies and how critical urban thinkers can contribute to challenging these perspectives. For more info about this public lecture, can be found here.
Finally, Dr. Mine Islar presented a lecture on new vocabulary of citizenship and the figure of activist citizen and the course was ended by the students’ presentations over two main themes:        1.The impact of the transformation of urban spaces on urban struggles and 2. Social movements and citizenship practices that can potentially address the urban issues. Students impressively used the course materials and concepts to apply these themes to the case study of Christiania and they well demonstrated how critical urban theory can be used in analyzing urban challenges and opportunities.
The course organizer would like to thank all the lecturers and students for their contributions to and participation in the course. Particularly, many thanks to Dr. Turaj Faran for his time and support in the planning phase and in participating the course activities which lifted up the level of teaching and learning to the fullest.

A collective picture of the course participants in Christiania, Copenhagen, Denmark. Photo by Dr. Maryam Nastar, LUCSUS.

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Paper on the Latin American Virgin of Cisne in Spain

by Eva Youkhana

A paper on ‘Migrants’ religious spaces and the power of Christian Saints –the Latin American Virgin of Cisne in Spain’ has been published in the ZEF Working Paper Series.

The paper deals with the role and agency of religious artefacts in reproducing collective identities and allocating social and financial resources. Please read or download the paper here.

“Partnership For Peace”: New article published by Fidelis Allen

Dr. Fidelis Allen is director of the Center for Gender and Conflict Studies of University Port Harcourt.

Recently Fidelis Allen has published an articel
“Partnership For Peace, Tackling The Threats And Raising The Prospects for Raising For Justice in Rivers State” in Advances in the Social Sciences Research Journal.

You have the opportunity to read the article
Partnership For Peace here.

No Women, No Peace: Gender Equality, Conflict and Peace in Myanmar

Myanmar Policy Briefing

There has long been a need for a deeper understanding of the intersections of gender, ethnicity and other identities in peace-building and democratisation. Progress on the rights of women and the participation by women’s organisations in conflict resolution and national reform are vital if sustainable peace and democracy are to be built within the country.

The article can be read and downloaded on Transnational Institute (TNI) online.

The Transnational Institute (TNI) is an international research and advocacy institute committed to building a just, democratic and sustainable planet. Please read here more about their visions and values.